"Proskuriakov creates his photographs, masterly using a lens instead of a brush, and light instead of paint. Moving in the semblance of a shamanic dance and moving the camera, in a single dynamic process, the artist creates a new light abstraction similar in intensity to abstract expressionism.

The famous representative of abstract expressionism Jackson Pollock founded the so-called Action Painting, which is a method of spontaneously applying an image to a canvas. This was embodied in the movements of the author's body during the drawing process. Spilling and splattering paint, he energetically moved around the canvas, as if dancing, and did not stop until he intuitively fixed the result. The artist's goal was to "directly transfer the creative process to the canvas". Critics called Pollock "Jack the Dripper" by analogy with the famous "Jack the Ripper".

In the presented project, Pavel Proskuriakov can be called "The Ripper of Reality", since he takes profane artifacts of the surrounding reality as the basis for creating his works, transforming them in the process of photography and turning them into an aesthetic product. The artist uses himself as an expressive dynamic tripod, and the camera matrix as a canvas on which he puts the necessary and sufficient amount of light and color. Outwardly, it looks like Pollock's quasi-ritual dances, but unlike the picturesque abstractionism, in Proskuriakov, we repeat, the basis for creating photographs is banal environmental objects. 

The project aims to demonstrate the process of creating photographs from a formal figurative basis through expressiveness and dynamism of action to a convincing aesthetic result directly related to the history of contemporary art of the 20th century."

                                                                                                                             

                                                                                                                                  Slava Mizin, art group "Blue Noses"

Homage to Rothko